2016 Conference‎ > ‎

Call for Proposals

EXTENDED to Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Email proposals to temacc-group@umich.edu


Several well-known documents describe the content we should include in math content courses for future teachers, including the following:

https://amte.net/sites/all/themes/amte/resources/EMS_Standards_AMTE2013.pdf

http://cbmsweb.org/MET2/met2.pdf


An upcoming document describes standards for teacher preparation programs in general, including (eventually) standards for the math content course piece of these programs.

https://amte.net/sites/default/files/mtp-standards-draft-jan2016.pdf


However, working with these documents can be challenging because, to cover high leverage content well, course designers of math content courses for future teachers need to make choices about what content will not be covered. The decisions we make about what content or practices to include, what not to include, how to make those decisions, and their implications is the theme for this years’ conference.


Rather than promote a particular type or length of session, we would like to see your ideas about how you have thought about or addressed any of the issues above. To give you some ideas, some possible directions for a proposed session fitting into this theme include:


  • Have you organized a course or unit in a course around supporting particular math practices? Which practices and why those over others? How do your course tasks support those practices?

  • Have you made decisions about particular content to leave out of your course? What content did you favor instead? How did you prioritize content? What has been the result of your prioritizations?

  • Is there content you include in your courses that at first glance seems “low leverage” compared to more standard topics? Why do you find that particular content important to your PSTs and worth including?

  • What questions have you faced over a period of time about what content to include in your courses? How have iterations of your course changed over time with respect to content included, and why have you made those changes?

  • How does your department or program make coordinated decisions about which content to include in your courses for PSTs? Or have you chosen not to coordinate? Have you coordinated between institutions? What have you found particularly effective or ineffective in your coordination efforts?

  • Is there a particular resource (research agenda, textbook, policy document, website) that you’ve found helpful in making decisions about what content to include in your course for future teachers? What resource and how has it helped shape your course?

  • How have your pedagogical design choices for your course (e.g., IBL, project-based, etc.) interacted with choices you make about what content to include?

  • Have you conducted any assessments or follow-up surveys with students to evaluate what content to include in your courses?

  • Have you (or your department or program) made content choices for your courses to better support educational equity (of your PSTs and/or their future students)? What choices did you make and how did you come to them?

  • Mathematicians and math educators can come at math content course design from different disciplinary perspectives. How can these populations learn from each other in deciding what content or practices to include in content courses for future teachers?

  • How can we access and utilize knowledge from in-service teachers, teacher leaders, and other personnel in the ISDs or RESAs to inform choices we make about the content included in math courses for future teachers?

  • Once you’ve identified your focused content areas for math courses, how do you best teach that material in ways that enable your PSTs to teach it to children?


Proposals (Due Monday, September 19 by the end of the day)


You may have work to share that doesn’t fit well into the overarching theme; we encourage all proposal submissions, whether or not they fit well into this year’s theme.


In less than one page, please describe:

  1. Your name(s), institution(s), and email address(es)

  2. Title of Proposal

  3. Abstract (for program)

  4. Ideal time frame for the session (this can be a range)

  5. Does this session fall into the conference theme? Or does it address some other area of teaching math content courses for future teachers?

  6. Short description of the session for the organizers. Include the purpose and goals for the session, as well as a brief outline of how you plan to use the time. If your proposed time is longer than 15 minutes, your outline should include ways to engage the audience.


Email proposals to temacc-group@umich.edu


Proposal Review Criteria:


  • Relevance to mathematics content courses for future teachers

  • Evidence of well thought-out goals and outline for the session

  • Potential for focused, productive discussion among participants

  • Clarity of proposal